Strong Concrete page 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COST COMPARISONS

AND ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS

 RELATING TO MY REINFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY

 

 

“Our Country, Right or Wrong.
When Right,to be kept Right,
 When Wrong,to be put Right."

                                                                                                                                                 — Carl Schurz

 

 

 

 

 

Or……

 

T’ings are either good an’ shtrong……

Or day is all week an’ bad…….

                                                                                                                   — Cletus Boudreaux

 

 

 

 

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The concrete reinforcement technology I have invented,

and subsequently patented and developed

is superior to most concrete reinforcement

methodologies currently practiced by the majority

of construction companies around the world.

 

 

 

     As well as my patented concrete reinforcement technology I developed, there are also protected claims regarding a new concrete flood protection barrier within the same patent that were directed towards causing the obsolescence or a reduction for the need of utilizing standard PZ-27 sheet piling in many flood protection works sanctioned by the engineering and design staff of the United States Army Corp of Engineers.

 

     The price of raw materials, including steel has “skyrocketed” during the past 4 years, and will increase to rise as macro economics become more substantially centered in the Far East in the near future.

 

     In applications where strength/cost ratios are of a prime consideration it will compete and out perform the primary standard PZ-27 sheet-piling format in a considerable degree of varied applications.

 

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     Standard PZ-27 is an acronym for a steel sheet-piling medium that is considered to weigh 27 pounds per square foot.  The reality of it is though, due to the various bends and folds in this medium it actually weighs closer to 32 pounds per square foot. 

 

     Spot steel prices in the United States are currently standing at approximately .45 cents a pound.  So, a square foot of PZ-27 steel sheet piling would cost around $ 14.40.  This is base cost, no discounts factored in for bulk purchases (which could be around 10 – 15%, or around $12.24 per square foot total cost, or approximately .38 cents per pound), no shipping/handling charges, no sales tax charges.

 

     That cost though, much like the cost of gasoline, can rise dramatically from fiscal quarter to fiscal quarter.

 

     Steel costs are probably not ever going to go down for a number of reasons.  Of prime consideration would be the steel consumption levels of China.  They are increasing, and their demand levels are going to continue to increase even higher during the next several decades, much like their increasing oil consumption levels.

 

     If one of those standard sheets of PZ-27 sheet piling were to be driven 60 feet below ground, the one-horizontal linear foot cost of this one portion of a floodwall would be  $734.00 - $864.00 depending on a discounted steel price at the mill in sheet piling materials cost alone. 

 

     On top of that one has to realize that this one medium alone usually is not the complete floodwall.  In many floodwater protection barrier designs, a footing still has to be constructed, and an additional concrete wall “married” to the top of the pile driven PZ-27.

 

     Additionally the previous costs involved with this commonly finished type floodwater protection barrier format is independent from financing charges, shipping and handling charges, design charges, construction costs and additional cost/profit margins that will be added to by the contractor who is awarded the bid to go construct this obsolete style of barrier.

 

     So, figuratively speaking, 60’ of pile driven PZ-27 with a 15’ tall concrete wall attached would probably cost the taxpayer somewhere in the neighborhood of around $2,500.00 - $3,500.00 per horizontal linear foot, if not more, of completed floodwall protection barrier depending on the contractor’s pricing methods, and the final bid award.

 

     Previous project specifications and final bid costs information on a variety of past floodwater protection barrier construction projects are available for your informational and comparison purposes at the United States Army Corp of Engineers District Command Headquarters, or at the GAO (Government Accounting Office) as a direct result of “The Freedom of Information Act” (F.O.I.A.) U.S.C. (United States Code) Sec. 552, which was enacted in 1966.

 

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What are the materials costs

of my technology?

 

 

 

                                           Raw Portland cement.        Market price?       Around $75.00 per ton.

                                           White Concrete Sand.        Market price?       Around $  6.00 per ton.

                                           Gravel Aggregate.              Market price?       Around $  9.00 per ton.

 

                                           A ton = 2,000 pounds.

                                           A yard of Gravel Aggregate weighs approximately 2,835 pounds.

                                           A yard of Concrete Sand      weighs approximately 2,700 pounds.

 

The formula for making a common basic yard

(3,000 p.s.i. or better mix) of concrete?

 

                                                        470 pounds of Portland cement    @ .0375 cents per pound.

                                                        1300 pounds of sand                   @ .003    cents per pound.

                                                        1900 pounds of gravel                  @ .0045 cents per pound

                                                      

                                                                      Water (6 to 14 gallons depending on.)

 

The above in industry standards is commonly referred to as a 6 sack mix.

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It will cost approximately $30.07 per cubic yard

materials cost only.

                                                   

(No taxes, no transportation, no storage, labor to batch,

                                                   cast, handle, insurance, etc. has been included in this cost).

 

                                 So at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .18

                                        at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .27

                                     at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .37

                                      at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .46

                                      at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .55

                                      at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $    .64

                                      at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .74

                                      at    thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .83

                                      at 10” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $   .92

                                      at 11” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.02

                                      at 12” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.11

                                      at 13” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.20

                                     at 14” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.29

                                      at 15” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.39

                                      at 16” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.48

                                      at 17” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.57

                                      at 18” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.67

                                      at 19” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.76

                                      at 20” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.85

                                      at 21” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 1.94

                                      at 22” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 2.04

                                      at 23” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 2.13

                                      at 24” thick, a square foot section of concrete would cost:  $ 2.22

 

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     As a suspected rule of thumb I am expressing right now, but it can be changed as a result of testing and data assimilation, is that for each approximate 1.00 to 1.75 inches of concrete depending on the ultimate finished thickness being cast, and the gauge of chain link mesh used, one layer of chain link should be used on that centerline for reinforcement purposes.

 

     I am assuming that a 9-gauge chain link mesh will be a “benchmark” standard, and it weighs approximately .74 # per square foot.  However, there are also 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12 gauge as well, and the base steel weight can either increase or decrease accordingly, as well as the utilization of a host of different mesh size dimensions.  2-1/4” mesh is the mesh size being used for comparison sake during the following contemplations, and calculations related to the subject matter.

 

     That cost @ .45 cents per pound steel costs would be: .33 cents per square foot of chain link mesh.  That cost is before weaving on a Burgandi weaving machine. 

 

     The labor cost on that portion of the process would be estimated to cost approximately 2 – 3 cents per square foot, and that is with the consideration that a weaving machine operator would be earning somewhere in the neighborhood of $14.00 per hour.

 

     Labor costs are also directly proportional to the speed setting on the machine, or even the ability to multi-task by the operator on several machines at one time.  In reality, a machine operator could even make $20.00 per hour or better, and the cost of this labor cannot be calculated because in relationship to production quotas generated the cost would be so minuscule that it could be calculated at .005 (five one thousandths of a dollar) cents or less per square foot.  But this is a separate topic of discussion.

 

 

 

 

                                  thick concrete,   1 layer of chain link embedded, steel cost:   $   .33      

                                  thick concrete,   2 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $   .66

                                  thick concrete,   2 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $   .66      

                                  thick concrete,   3 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $   .99

                                  thick concrete,   3 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $   .99      

                                  thick concrete,   4 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 1.32

                                  thick concrete,   4 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 1.32      

                                  thick concrete,   5 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 1.65

                                10” thick concrete,   5 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 1.65      

                                11” thick concrete,   6 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 1.98

                                12” thick concrete,   6 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 1.98      

                                13” thick concrete,   7 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 2.31

                                14” thick concrete,   7 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 2.31      

                                15” thick concrete,   8 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 2.64

                                16” thick concrete,   8 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 2.64      

                                17” thick concrete,   9 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 2.97

                                18” thick concrete,   9 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 2.97      

                                19” thick concrete, 10 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 3.33

                                20” thick concrete, 11 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 3.63      

                                21” thick concrete, 12 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 3.96

                                22” thick concrete, 12 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 3.96     

                                23” thick concrete, 13 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 4.29

                                24” thick concrete, 13 layers of chain link embedded, steel cost:  $ 4.29

 

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I AM NOT SURE ABOUT THE NEED FOR A REDUNDANT REBAR SETUP (or similar type paraphernalia) IN THIS MATRIX, BUT TESTING CAN ANSWER THIS QUESTION EASILY ENOUGH.  BUT, FOR COMPARISONS AND EVALUATIONS SAKE, THE WEIGHTS AND COSTS OF THIS MATERIAL HAVE BEEN ENTERED HERE FOR FINAL COST COMPARISON AND CONSIDERATION VALUES.

 

     Of course wire gauge, metallurgy, corrosion inhibitors, size of rebar, thickness of concrete, concrete mix, or any other combination and differences attributable to each where strength or duty rating calculations would be concerned are merely academic at this point in discussion but can be expounded upon subsequent to future testing and analysis procedures.

    

     I am going to assume a 3/8” rebar.  This size of rebar weighs approximately .376# per linear foot, or costs approximately .17 cents per linear foot.

 

     This rebar can be placed realistically @ , or or @ 12” on center in the chain link.  So with this in mind, it would be understood that there will either be 1, 2, or 3 linear feet of 3/8” rebar per square foot of each layer of chain link mesh that is embedded in the concrete.  The approximate cost of this if the rebar is placed @ 12” on center per layer of chain link should be as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

                                  thick concrete,   1 layer  c.l.,      -     1 l.f. of rebar  steel cost: $    .16      

                                  thick concrete,   2 layers c.l.,     -     2 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .32

                                  thick concrete,   2 layers c.l,      -     2 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .32      

                                  thick concrete,   3 layers c.l.,     -     3 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .48

                                  thick concrete,   3 layers c.l,      -     3 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .48

                                  thick concrete,   4 layers c.l.,     -     4 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .64

                                  thick concrete,   4 layers c.l,      -     4 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .64      

                                  thick concrete,   5 layers c.l.,     -     5 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .80

                                10” thick concrete,   5 layers c.l,      -     5 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .80

                                11” thick concrete,   6 layers c.l,      -     6 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .96

                                12” thick concrete,   6 layers c.l,      -     6 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $    .96

                                13” thick concrete,   7 layers c.l,      -     7 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.12

                                14” thick concrete,   7 layers c.l,      -     7 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.12

                                15” thick concrete,   8 layers c.l,      -     8 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.28

                                16” thick concrete,   8 layers c.l,      -     8 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.28

                                17” thick concrete,   9 layers c.l,      -     9 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.44

                                18” thick concrete,   9 layers c.l,      -     9 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.44

                                19” thick concrete, 10 layers c.l,      -   10 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.60

                                20” thick concrete, 11 layers c.l,      -   11 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.76

                                21” thick concrete, 12 layers c.l,      -   12 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.92

                                22” thick concrete, 12 layers c.l,      -   12 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  1.92

                                23” thick concrete, 13 layers c.l,      -   13 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  2.08

                                24” thick concrete, 13 layers c.l,      -   13 l.f. of rebar steel cost:  $  2.08

 

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THE APPROXIMATE COMBINED MATERIALS COSTS

OF THE ABOVE CONCRETE, CHAIN LINK MESH,

AND REBAR WOULD BE:

 

 

  thick $    .67 per square foot.

   thick $  1.25 per square foot.

  thick $  1.35 per square foot.

  thick $  1.93 per square foot.

  thick $  2.02 per square foot.

  thick $  2.60 per square foot.

  thick $  2.70 per square foot.

  thick $  3.28 per square foot.

10” thick $  3.37 per square foot.

11” thick $  3.96 per square foot.

12” thick $  4.05 per square foot.

13” thick $  4.63 per square foot.

14” thick $  4.72 per square foot.

15” thick $  5.31 per square foot.

16” thick $  5.40 per square foot.

17” thick $  5.98 per square foot.

18” thick $  6.08 per square foot.

19” thick $  6.69 per square foot.

20” thick $  7.24 per square foot.

21” thick $  7.82 per square foot.

22” thick $  7.92 per square foot.

23” thick $  8.50 per square foot.

24” thick $  8.59 per square foot.

 

 

“I DO NOT HAVE ANY ENGINEERING DATA IN FRONT OF ME, BUT I WOULD BE WILLING TO BET THAT AT SOMEWHERE BETWEEN 8 INCHES AND 24 INCHES THICK, A CONCRETE PANEL OF MINE, WITH THE ABOVE LISTED LAYERS OF CHAIN LINK AND REBAR IN IT, WOULD STOP A FULLY LOADED 18 WHEELER HURTLING DOWN THE HIGHWAY DEAD IN ITS TRACKS IF IT WERE TO RUN INTO A WALL MADE OUT OF THIS STUFF”

 

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THE ABOVE FINAL APPROXIMATE PRICING IS MATERIALS COST ONLY;

IT DOES NOT INCLUDE MANUFACTURING COSTS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manufacturing costs encompass a broad spectrum of effects.  They include subjects that relate to variable overhead costs, fixed overhead costs, or in essence, what it costs to open the factory doors in the morning, turn on the lights, get the equipment running, replace the hammer or the shovel that was broken the day before and is needed today, cleaning molds, setting up molds, moving materials around the yard, secretaries filling out paperwork and answering telephones, workers taking coffee breaks, the occasional goofy that gets the forklift stuck in the mud for an hour or so, and it takes 5 men to go pull it out, the broken steam generator, or the idiot that thinks his wife, kids, dog and cat are the reason he is being held back in life so he drinks 3 six packs of beer the night before and doesn’t show up for work that day, setting production levels in his little sector of the composition back a few percentage points for the day, etc., etc., etc.

 

 

 

 

For right now I am going to focus on what it actually costs, in far as motion and activities involved, to produce a concrete panel that is pretty much 10 feet wide, 70 feet long and 12 inches in thickness. Skeptics, or ‘The Devil’s Advocate are sort of a tedious thing to endure, so please, if you are one of these, just sit back and let me tell you how it is done, then you can wander back to your buddies little office down the hall to sulk and pout because you feel slighted.  Chief, get un la vie.

 

 

 

 

The activities involved are (look at the pictorial section of this website for a general ‘basic’ idea of what is involved) the manpower and time involved in:

 

 

 

Setting up the casting platform,

Setting the mold forms,

Prepping the chain link at the casting platform,

Stretching the chain link,

Inserting the rebar,

Tying off the chain link,

Batching the cement,

Casting the cement,

Finishing the cement,

Stocking the finished product for shipping,

Stripping the mold frames,

Cleaning the mold frames,

Cleaning the casting platform,

Initiating production turnaround.

 

 

Bear in mind that the pictorial section displayed on this website are basic “prototype” or “shade tree mechanic” processes, and the efficiency can be increased 100 fold through the use of better technology that I already have in mind.

 

 

 

 

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750 sq foot production panel model

is being demonstrated for basic cost referencing.

 

 

                       Setting up the casting platform, 

                                              2 men @ $ 13.33 hr. = $ 26.66 hr. or .44 cents per minute. Starting wage

                                              15 minutes.

                                              $ 6.66                                                                   $.008 cents per square foot.

 

                        Setting the mold forms,

                                              2 men @ $ 13.33 hr. = $ 26.66 hr. or .44 cents per minute. Starting wage

                                              15 minutes.

                                              $ 6.66                                                                     $.008 cents per square foot.

                                                                               

                       Prepping the chain link at the casting platform,

                                               2 men @ $12.44 hr. = $ 24.88 hr. or .31 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                               15 minutes.

                                               $ 4.66                                                                 $.006 cents per square foot.

                                                                                                         Per layer of chain link used in the cast.

 

                       Stretching the chain link,

                                               2 men @ $ 9.33 hr. = $ 18.66 hr. or .31 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                               15 minutes.

                                               $ 4.66                                                               $.006 cents per square foot.

                                                                                                          Per layer of chain link used in the cast.

 

                      Inserting the rebar in the chain link,

                                               2 men @ $ 9.33 hr. = $ 18.66 hr. or .31 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                               1 hour.

                                               $ 18.60                                                                $.02 cents per square foot.

                                                                                                           Per layer of chain link used in the cast.

 

                     Tying off the chain link,

                                               2 men @ $ 9.33 hr. = $ 18.66 hr. or .31 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                               300 ties @ 6” on center line 

                                               1 hour per layer

                                               $ 18.66                                                               $.02 cents per square foot.

                                                                                                           Per layer of chain link used in the cast.

 

                     Batching the cement,

                                                3 men @ $20.00 hr. =$60.00 hr. or $1.00 dollar per minute. Starting wage

                                                1 yard per minute production

                                                $ 1.00 per yard                                               $ .003 cents per square foot.

                                                                                                                                 Per inch of concrete cast.

                     Casting the cement,

                                                3 men @ $ 16.00 hr. = $ 48.00 hr. or .80 cents per minute.    Starting wage

                                                1 hr. per 750 sq. ft. mold                                             $.06 cents per square foot.

                                                

                     Finishing the cement,

                                                3 men @ $ 16.00 hr. = $ 48.00 hr. or .80 cents per minute.   Starting wage

                                                1 hr. per 750 sq. ft. mold                                         .06 cents per square foot.

 

                     Stocking the finished product for shipping,

                                                3 men @ $ 16.00 hr. = $ 48.00 hr. or .80 cents per minute.    Starting wage

                                                1 hr. per 750 sq. ft. mold                                         .06 cents per square foot.

 

                     Stripping the mold frames,

                                                2 men @ $10.66 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .35 cents per minute.      Starting wage

                                                30 minutes.

                                                $ 10.65                                                                  $.01 cents per square foot.

 

                     Cleaning the mold frames,

                                                2 men @ $10.66 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .35 cents per minute.      Starting wage

                                                30 minutes.

                                                $ 10.65                                                                  $.01 cents per square foot.

 

                     Cleaning the casting platform.

                                                 2 men @ $10.66 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .26 cents per minute.      Starting wage

                                                 30 minutes.

                                                 $ 10.65                                                                  $.01 cents per square foot.

 

                     Initiating production turnaround.

                                                 2 men @ $10.65 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .26 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                                 30 minutes.

                                                 $ 10.65                                                                 $.01 cents per square foot. 

 

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THE APPROXIMATE COMBINED LABOR COSTS ASSOCIATED

WITH THE ABOVE JOB BILLETS AND TASKS WOULD BE:

 

Or specifically:

 

  thick concrete,   1 layer c.l.,      -     1 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .27

  thick concrete,   2 layers c.l.,     -     2 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .30

  thick concrete,   2 layers c.l,      -     2 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .31

  thick concrete,   3 layers c.l.,     -     3 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .35

  thick concrete,   3 layers c.l,      -     3 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .35

  thick concrete,   4 layers c.l.,     -     4 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .39

  thick concrete,   4 layers c.l,      -     4 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .40

  thick concrete,   5 layers c.l.,     -     5 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .43

10” thick concrete,   5 layers c.l,      -     5 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .44

11” thick concrete,   6 layers c.l,      -     6 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .44

12” thick concrete,   6 layers c.l,      -     6 l.f. of rebar cost:  $    .45

                                       13” thick concrete,   7 layers c.l,      -     7 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .48

14” thick concrete,   7 layers c.l,      -     7 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .48

15” thick concrete,   8 layers c.l,      -     8 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .51

16” thick concrete,   8 layers c.l,      -     8 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .52

17” thick concrete,   9 layers c.l,      -     9 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .60

18” thick concrete,   9 layers c.l,      -     9 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .61

19” thick concrete, 10 layers c.l,      -   10 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .64

20” thick concrete, 11 layers c.l,      -   11 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .68

21” thick concrete, 12 layers c.l,      -   12 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .72

22” thick concrete, 12 layers c.l,      -   12 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .72

23” thick concrete, 13 layers c.l,      -   13 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .76

24” thick concrete, 13 layers c.l,      -   13 l.f. of rebar  cost:  $    .76

 

 

 

 

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THE APPROXIMATE COMBINED MATERIALS COSTS

OF THE ABOVE CONCRETE, CHAIN LINK MESH,

AND REBAR COUPLED WITH LABOR WOULD BE:

 

 

  thick $    .94 per square foot.

  thick $  1.55 per square foot.

  thick $  1.66 per square foot.

  thick $  2.28 per square foot.

  thick $  2.37 per square foot.

  thick $  2.99 per square foot.

  thick $  3.10 per square foot.

  thick $  3.71 per square foot.

10” thick $  3.81 per square foot.

11” thick $  4.40 per square foot.

12” thick $  4.49 per square foot.

13” thick $  5.11 per square foot.

14” thick $  5.20 per square foot.

15” thick $  5.82 per square foot.

16” thick $  5.92 per square foot.

17” thick $  6.58 per square foot.

18” thick $  6.69 per square foot.

19” thick $  7.33 per square foot.

20” thick $  7.92 per square foot.

21” thick $  8.54 per square foot.

22” thick $  8.64 per square foot.

23” thick $  9.26 per square foot.

24” thick $  9.35 per square foot.

 

 

 

 

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To reference and translate the above materials cost only information into a linear foot example if the finished 75 foot in length concrete panel were to be compared to steel PZ-27 that is 60’ in length, based on the market price of $12.24 per square foot for the PZ-27, @ a cost of $734.00 per horizontal linear foot without the additional 15 foot tall wall section above grade that is necessary for it to truly be a floodwater protection medium, the below costs and ratios for comparison are listed.

 

 

 

(In other words, I allowed for the contractor PZ-27 purchase in bulk and perhaps receive a 15% savings at the mill, and it is not even all the materials necessary to build a floodwall.  As well as that, a 15 foot tall section still has to be added to the top.)

 

 

                                      My materials cost versus         Cost savings

                                        Versus a contractors                    ratio:

                                         PZ-27 materials cost:   

 

  thick $   70.50 per linear foot,    or  10.41:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 116.25 per linear foot,    or    6.32:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 124.50 per linear foot,    or    5.90:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 171.00 per linear foot,    or    4.29:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 177.75 per linear foot,    or    4.13:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 224.00 per linear foot,    or    3.28:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 232.50 per linear foot,    or    3.16:01 cost advantage ratio

  thick $ 278.25 per linear foot,    or    2.64:01 cost advantage ratio

10” thick $ 285.75 per linear foot,    or    2.56:01 cost advantage ratio

11” thick $ 330.00 per linear foot,    or    2.22:01 cost advantage ratio

12” thick $ 336.75 per linear foot,    or    2.18:01 cost advantage ratio

13” thick $ 383.25 per linear foot,    or    1.91:01 cost advantage ratio

14” thick $ 390.00 per linear foot,    or    1.88:01 cost advantage ratio

15” thick $ 436.50 per linear foot,    or    1.68:01 cost advantage ratio

16” thick $ 444.00 per linear foot,    or    1.65:01 cost advantage ratio

17” thick $ 493.50 per linear foot,    or    1.48:01 cost advantage ratio

18” thick $ 501.75 per linear foot,    or    1.46:01 cost advantage ratio

19” thick $ 549.75 per linear foot,    or    1.33:01 cost advantage ratio

20” thick $ 594.00 per linear foot,    or    1.23:01 cost advantage ratio

21” thick $ 640.50 per linear foot,    or    1.14:01 cost advantage ratio

22” thick $ 648.75 per linear foot,    or    1.13:01 cost advantage ratio

23” thick $ 694.50 per linear foot,    or    1.05:01 cost advantage ratio

                          24” thick $ 701.25 per linear foot,    or    1.04:01 cost advantage ratio

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

“I DO NOT HAVE ANY ENGINEERING DATA IN FRONT OF ME, BUT I WOULD BE WILLING TO BET THAT AT SOMEWHERE BETWEEN 2 INCHES AND 24 INCHES THICK, A CONCRETE PANEL THAT UTILIZES MY STRUCTURAL REINFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY, WITH THE PREVIOUSLY LISTED LAYERS OF CHAIN LINK AND REBAR IN IT, WILL PERFORM THE SAME BASIC DUTIES, WITH THE SAME OR ENHANCED STRUCTURAL BEHAVIOR CHARACTERISTICS AS PZ-27 STEEL SHEET PILING DEMONSTRATES IF UTILIZED IN FLOODWATER PROTECTION BARRIER CONSTRUCTION”. 

 

 

 

 

In addition to that, the above ratios and costs were calculated out at 75 foot in length of concrete materials versus 60 feet of PZ-27 materials.  So even at a 24” thick panel which is unbelievably strong, PZ-27 costs and my technology costs are dukeing it out toe to toe, AND I HAVE 15 MORE LINEAR FEET IN LENGTH ATTACHED TO MY COSTS BENCHMARK POSTED.  SO I AM ACTUALLY GIVING PZ-27 A 25% MATERIALS COST/VOLUME - VALUE COMPARISON ADVANTAGE RIGHT OFF THE START.  BUT I DO NOT WANT TO BE ACCUSED OF TAKING AN UNFAIR ACCOUNTING ADVANTAGE OF THAT TIRED OLD OBSOLETE MEDIUM…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are several more accommodations that are needed in order to utilize my panelized form of concrete serving in the status of flood protection barrier:

 

     The PZ-27 after it is pile driven into the ground (which is @ cost +?????  Probably around $1,470.00 and up per horizontal linear foot if not better, contractors price to the taxpayer, depending upon final pile driven depth that is reached which in this instance is 60 foot subsurface) is generally capped with a concrete wall, hence the final $2500.00 – $3,500.00 per linear foot basic contemplations for comparison price posted at the beginning of this rather lengthy dissertation.

 

     Additional materials accommodations needed to install my panels for floodwater protection barriers are:  Concrete “H” posts, additional concrete, and grout.

 

     I am going to compare one randomly picked combination of my formats for cost comparisons sake, which I strongly suspect will perform admirably, coupled with its forecasted installation costs, versus a commonly constructed flood protection barrier that would utilize 60’ depth of pile driven PZ-27 sheet piling capped with a 15’ tall, 2 foot thick concrete wall constructed by some other contractor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOR MY COMPARATIVE

FLOODWATER PROTECTION BARRIER

COMBINATION MANUFACTURED AND INSTALLED

PRICING FOR THE SAKE

OF A WRITTEN EXAMPLE IN RELATION TO

COST CONSIDERATIONS I WILL UTILIZE:

 

 

            I am going to cost factor a 12” thick panel.

 

           This 12” thick panel will be 10 feet wide.

 

           This 12” X 10’ panel will stand @ 15’ above ground.

 

          This same 12” X 10’ panel will also extend 60’ subsurface.

 

           In all the measurements of this panel are: 12” X 10’ X 75’

 

           I will use 24” X 24” concrete “H” posts that are 100 feet long.

 

          This same concrete post will extend 85 feet below ground and stand 15 feet

           above surface grade.  (The PZ-27 will only have a bottom footing located at 60’ subsurface).

 

          This 24” x 24” 100 foot long “H” post is placed @ 12’ on center.

 

          The 12” X 10’ X 75’ panel is slid in place between the posts, and suspended

           by the same posts, with a grout mixture sealing the void between

           the subsurface portion of the panel and the trench sides.

 

          In all the, 24” x 24” 100 foot long “H” posts extends 85’ subsurface,

           and the panels extend 60’ subsurface with 15’ of panel and post

           standing above the surface.

 

 

          Bear in mind that the pictorial section displayed are basic “prototype”

          or “shade tree mechanic” processes, and the efficiency can easily be

          increased 100 fold through the use of better technologies that I already

          have in mind.

 

 

 

 

 

Producing the 24” X 24” X 100’ post,

Installing the wall:

 

 

 

 

     Panel cost:  $285.00 per linear foot.

 

     42 x 42 x .7865 x 1,020 - 587,520 divided by 46,656 x 30.07 divided by 11 = $ per linear foot

     for post hole concrete cost during installation:

 

     $48.49 per linear foot for post hole concrete.

 

     24 x 24 x 1,200 divided by 46,656 X 30.07 divided by 11 = $ per linear foot for concrete post cost.

 

     $40.49 per finished horizontal linear foot of floodwall for post concrete.

 

     Rebar for posts.  $131.00 per linear foot for rebar. 

 

 

Approximately $504.98 per linear foot

Involved for the materials cost

of the above listed combinations

 

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

Labor to make posts:

 

 

                     Setting up the casting platform, 

                                               2 men @ $ 13.33 hr. = $ 26.66 hr. or .44 cents per minute. Starting wage

                                               15 minutes.

                                               $ 6.60                $. 66 cents per linear foot of flood wall with posts @ 12’ c.l.

 

                     Setting the mold forms,

                                                2 men @ $ 13.33 hr. = $ 26.66 hr. or .44 cents per minute. Starting wage

                                                15 minutes.

                                                $ 6.60               $. 66 cents per linear foot of flood wall with posts @ 12’ c.l.

                                                                              

                     Tying off the rebar,

                                                2 men @ $ 9.33 hr. = $ 18.66 hr. or .31 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                                30 minutes

                                                $ 9.30.              $. 66 cents per linear foot of flood wall with posts @ 12’ c.l.

                                                      

                     Prepping the post casting mold at the casting platform,

                                                2 men @ $12.44 hr. = $ 24.88 hr. or .31 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                                15 minutes.

                                                $ 4.66               $. 46 cents per linear foot of flood wall with posts @ 12’ c.l.

 

                     Batching the cement,

                                                 3 men @ $20.00 hr. =$60.00 hr. or $1.00 dollar per minute. Starting wage

                                                1 yard per minute production

                                                $ 1.00 per yard $. 49 cents per linear foot of flood wall with posts @ 12’

 

                     Casting the cement,

                                                3 men @ $ 16.00 hr. = $ 48.00 hr. or .80 cents per minute.    Starting wage

                                 1/2 hr. per 75 ft. mold          $2.40 per linear foot of flood wall with posts @ 12’

 

                     Finishing the cement,

                                                3 men @ $ 16.00 hr. = $ 48.00 hr. or .80 cents per minute.   Starting wage

                                                20 minutes per 75 ft. post                                        

                                                $16.00                                     $1.60 per linear foot of floodwall with posts @ 12’

 

                     Stocking the finished product for shipping,

                                                3 men @ $ 16.00 hr. = $ 48.00 hr. or .80 cents per minute.    Starting wage

                                                15 minutes per 750 ft. post                                        

                                                $12.00                        $1.60 per linear foot of floodwall with posts @ 12’

 

                     Stripping the mold frames,

                                                2 men @ $10.66 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .35 cents per minute.      Starting wage

                                                $ 10.65                           $1.06 per linear foot of floodwall with posts @ 12’

 

 

                     Cleaning the mold frames,

                                                2 men @ $10.66 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .35 cents per minute.      Starting wage

                                                $ 10.65                       $1.06 per linear foot of floodwall with posts @ 12’

 

                     Cleaning the casting platform.

                                                2 men @ $10.66 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .26 cents per minute.      Starting wage

                                                30 minutes.

                                                $ 10.65                       $1.06 per linear foot of floodwall with posts @ 12’

 

                    Initiating production turnaround.

                                                2 men @ $10.65 hr. = $21.32 hr. or .26 cents per minute.     Starting wage

                                                30 minutes.

                                                $ 10.65                       $1.06 per linear foot of floodwall with posts @ 12’

 

 

Approximately $11.71 per linear foot

for the combination of the labor

costs involved and listed directly above.

 

 

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

The combined approximate costs comparisons

involved in the installation phase:

 

 

THAT IS A KNOWN APPROXIMATE FACTOR, HOWEVER

THE METHODOLOGIES AND SEQUENTIAL

PROCESSING STEPS AND TECHNIQUES

INVOLVED

ARE PROPRIETARY INFORMATION….

 

THEY WILL FOLLOW SOME OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES

OF ADDITIONAL PATENTED PROCESSES INCLUDED

IN THE CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT

TECHNOLOGY PATENT WAS ISSUED……………….

 

THEY VARY SLIGHTLY,

AND THEY WILL NOT BE DISCUSSED

   AT THIS POINT IN TIME, but …………..

 

 

The procedures and costs involved have been tabulated

and they are considered to be approximately $158.11

per completed horizontal linear foot of my style of flood protection barrier.

 

 

 

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

Approximately $ 674.72 per linear foot

Is considered to be the total combined approximate costs

for the combination of the ABOVE

listings for my technology to be:

Manufactured, Assembled, Delivered,

and Installed as a Finished project

by my crews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

NOW:

 

Considering the per pound steel price of

 .38 cents per pound to .45 cents per pound or;

$734.00 - $864.00 per linear horizontal linear foot

project materials cost ONLY

for 60’ OF PZ-27

SITTING ON A LOADING DOCK SOMEWHERE…………..

 

 

My Finished Project Basic Cost

compared to the $734.00 per

stacked horizontal floodwall linear foot

of PZ-27 materials COSTS sitting on a loading dock

somewhere would be:

 

$60.00 per linear foot to be saved,

on a FINISHED PROJECT.

 

 

 

 

Or…

 

 

 

 

a 1.08:01 Cost Savings Ratio

 

 

 

 

 

********************

 

 

 

 

Considering the per pound steel price of

 .38 cents per pound to .45 cents per pound or;

$734.00 - $864.00 per linear horizontal linear foot

project materials cost ONLY

for 60’ OF PZ-27

SITTING ON A LOADING DOCK SOMEWHERE…………..

 

 

My Finished Project Basic Cost

compared to the $864.00 per

stacked horizontal floodwall linear foot

of PZ-27 materials COSTS sitting on a loading dock

somewhere would be:

 

 

 

$190.00 per linear foot to be saved

on the FINISHED PROJECT.

 

 

 

 

Or…

 

 

 

 

a 1.28:01 Cost Savings Ratio

 

 

 

 

*****************************

 

 

 

NOW CONVERSELY:

 

Considering the previously stated finished project price of

$2,500.00 - $3,500.00 per linear foot pricing to the taxpayer

by a formal contractor using his obsolete finished methodologies,

versus MY format’s FINISHED COSTS for comparison

at approximately $647.72 per linear foot.

 

 

 

 

 

My Finished Project Basic Cost:

compared to the lowball finished PZ-27 contractors

price of $2,500.00 per completed horizontal floodwall

linear foot would be:

 

$1,826.00 per linear foot saved

on the FINISHED PROJECT.

 

Or…..

 

a 3.85:01 Cost Savings Ratio

 

 

 

 

 

 

********************

 

 

 

 

 

Considering the previously stated finished project price of

$2,500.00 - $3,500.00 per linear foot pricing to the taxpayer

by a formal contractor using his obsolete finished methodologies,

versus MY format’s FINISHED COSTS for comparison

at approximately $647.72 per linear foot.

 

My Finished Project Basic Cost:

compared to finished PZ-27 contractors

price of $3,500.00 per completed horizontal floodwall

linear foot would be:

 

$2,853.00 per linear foot saved

on the FINISHED PROJECT.

 

 

 

 

 

Or…..

 

 

 

 

 

a 5.40:01 Cost Savings Ratio……………………………………….

 

 

 

 

 

And my posts are positioned at 12 foot on center and resting at 85 feet below the ground surface grade. My panels, same as the Pz-27 REST AT 60 FEET BELOW THE GROUND. AND MY SUPERIOR AND SAFER CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY IS STANDING AT THE SAME 15 FEET ABOVE GRADE SERVING AS THE FLOOD WALL.

 

 

 

 

Realize that I would have 25 feet deeper stabilization values

associated with my finished format.

 

 

 

 

     So, in other words, there is a probable savings of between approximately $1,826.00 TO $2,853.00 per linear foot by utilizing my technology and installation measures instead of the obsolete PZ-27 approaches that have failed in the past and are still currently being advocated as what is needed, and what they intend to use.  Any enhancements on their basic profiles to make their design sturdier to hopefully ward off any future failures will be proportionately added to the final costs to the taxpayer.

 

     Instead of the $ 2,500.00 - $ 3,500.00 per linear foot charges to the Corp of Engineers I focused on in my comparison formulas above, the new cost pricing methods to accommodate their structural engineering improvements should undoubtedly escalate to $3,375.00 to $4,725.00 per linear foot charged to the taxpayer by their contractor.

 

     And that reengineered format still won’t be what is really needed.  20 feet to 25 feet above grade is what is desired, so now that previous cost can theoretically advance to $6,709.00 and up per linear foot by a contractor practicing obsolete construction methodologies to cover the additional constructed safety requirements.  It is a vicious circle and a never-ending circus I gott’a tell ya. 

 

     There are over 5,000 linear feet in a mile, how many miles upon miles upon miles of floodwater protection barriers are taxpayers going to be providing for Louisiana, and how much are they going to be paying for Le Joke Du Jour a Louisiane’, especially if the new turns out to be the same-old/same-old PZ-27 only dressed up in different clothing that already has cost the taxpayers billions upon billions and quite a few lives because it was so inefficient?

 

 

 

 

 

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